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Making your super last

Posted on January 19, 2015 by admin


When Australians reach retirement age, they have the option of withdrawing their superannuation as a lump sum or taking a pension that will be a reliable source of income for a number of years. Taking out your superannuation as a lump sum can be incredibly tempting, especially if you reach retirement age with some debts that still need to be paid off. However, blowing through your superannuation is easier than you think. If you choose to withdraw a lump sum, then you find your superannuation is insufficient to fund a comfortable retirement. Industry experts estimate that a single person needs an income of approximately $43 000 per annum to fund a comfortable retirement while a couple needs approximately $58 000. The age pension, at its current rate, only just exceeds half of these amounts. If you are nearing retirement age, you should carefully consider your options when it comes to withdrawing your superannuation. If there is some reason that you need to make a lump sum withdrawal, for example, a daunting mortgage, then you may care to investigate a variety of strategies. Remaining in the workforce for an additional few years will boost your superannuation savings and the transition to […]


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Penalty interest deductibles

June 24, 2019

The ATO has recently replaced the Taxation Ruling (TR) 93/7W on whether penalty interest is deductible to the new TR 2019/2. This new ruling highlights the circumstances in which penalty interest is deductible and the situations where it is not.

“Penalty interest” refers to an amount charged by a lender to a borrower under a loan agreement if instalments are not paid. The payable amount is then calculated by reference to a number of months of interest that would have been received.

TR 2019/2 says that penalty interest is generally deductible under section 8-1 where:

Penalty interest that is incurred to discharge a mortgage is also deductible under section 25-30, to the extent that borrowed funds were used to produce assessable income. The ATO makes a note that unlike the general deduction provisions, there’s no influence from the expense being capital or revenue in nature.

You cannot deduct a loss or outgoing under section 8-1(2) to the extent that: