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ATO’s data matching programs

The Australian Tax Office (ATO) has sophisticated data matching programs in place to ensure individuals and businesses are complying with their obligations and to uphold the integrity of the tax system for the community at large.

The Tax Office uses data matching to pre-fill tax returns, ensure people and businesses are lodging tax returns and activity statements when required, correctly declaring their income and claiming offsets, and meeting their tax obligations.

It helps to detect dishonest individuals and businesses operating outside the tax system, detect fraud against the Commonwealth and to recover debt.

The following areas are currently under close scrutiny:

Credit and debit cards
The ATO obtains data from banks and financial institutions to identify the total credit and debit card payments received by Australian businesses.

Specialised payment systems
Data on electronic payments made through specialised payment systems to Australian businesses is analysed in conjunction with data collected through the credit and debit card data-matching program.

Business transactions through payment systems
Data is collected from organisations that process electronic payments for businesses in a report.

Online selling
Details of online sellers who sell goods and services to the value of $12,000 or more is attained. Data is obtained from online selling sites where the data owner or its subsidiary:
– Operates a business in Australia that is governed by Australian law.
– Provides an online marketplace for businesses and individuals to buy and sell goods and services.
– Tracks the activity of registered sellers.
– Has clients whose annual trading activity amounts to $12,000 or more.
– Has trading activity for the years in focus.

Ride-sourcing
Data is obtained from ride-sourcing facilitators operating in Australia and/or their financial institutions to identify ride-sourcing drivers. This information is used to notify drivers and help them understand their tax obligations.

Motor vehicle registries
The Tax Office acquires data from all the state and territory motor vehicle registering bodies to identify all motor vehicles sold, transferred or newly registered, where the transfer and/or market value is $10,000 or more.

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News

Tax on super death benefits for dependants vs non-dependants

July 9, 2020

A super death benefit is the super paid after a person’s death, usually to a nominated beneficiary. These benefits are subject to different tax treatments, depending on whether the beneficiaries are dependant or non-dependant.

Superannuation death benefits will generally be received tax-free by tax dependants, who are considered to be:

Dependants will not have to pay tax on the tax-free component of their super in the event that they:

However, they will be taxed at their marginal rate if they receive a capped benefit income stream and:

Not all super death benefits are subject to tax; for non-dependants, there is a taxable portion. This component is largely made up of after-tax super contributions that the deceased member has made.

Super death benefit payments are subject to tax when:

Non-dependants must calculate how much money in the super account is a:

The amount of tax non-dependants pay will be based on their marginal tax rate, however, this amount may be reduced by tax offsets. For the taxed element of the taxable component, the effective tax rate is your marginal tax rate of 17% (whichever is lower). For the untaxed element of the taxable component, the effective tax rate is 32% or your marginal tax rate (whichever is lower).