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Avoid being short changed with your super

With recent regulatory changes to super contributions, it is easier than ever to ensure your employer is paying you the super you are entitled to.

There are specific steps you can take to ensure you are being paid correctly. Consider the following:

Understand your entitlements
Employers have to put 9.5 per cent of an employee’s wage into their superannuation account. As of July 2017, these contributions must be made quarterly through the super clearing house. This was introduced by the ATO to prevent dishonest employers from ripping off their employees. If you have not received a quarterly payment by the 28th of the following month, contact the ATO, and they will investigate this on your behalf.

Consolidate your accounts
If you have had various jobs throughout your working life, there is a good chance you have more than one super account. If you do, you will be paying excess account fees. You should look to roll over your funds into one account and close the leftover accounts.

Research
It is advantageous to do your research and be informed regarding your super. This will guarantee you a fund that will provide you with the financial security you deserve when it comes time to retire. You can do this by researching the product disclosure statement of various funds and investigating where your contributions are being invested as well as what kinds of fees you are being charged.

Personal contributions
Making regular personal contributions to your superannuation account can mean the difference of over $100,000 when you retire. Form a plan that works for you, such as setting up a direct payment of $20 a fortnight or $100 a month. This is a great way to take ownership over how comfortably you want to retire.

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News

Do you know where your super is?

February 21, 2019

If you’re not close to retiring, you may not be thinking about your super or where it is. Even if you are a way off from retiring, you should be keeping track of where your super has gone. $17.5 billion of super was lost in 2017-18, $420 million down from the previous year. If you are not paying attention to your super contributions, accounts and insurances, you may have lost super. You may also have unintentionally lost track of super if you have ever changed your name, address, job or lived overseas.

It is not uncommon for people to have multiple super accounts they have acquired over the years of working at different companies. Having multiple unused accounts can result in high fees that drain your untouched super or you could lose track of it completely. It is in your best interest to consolidate all super into one account that suits your retirement goals. When closing unused accounts, you should be mindful of any termination fees, insurance policies, investment options, and ongoing service fees.

If you have lost track of your super it may be held by either your super fund as a lost account or as an ATO-held account. The easiest way to consolidate super is through the myGov website, linking the ATO to records of your super funds