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SMSF annual return for pension phase trustees

Posted on November 15, 2017 by admin


Self-managed super fund (SMSF) trustees who are in pension phase must lodge their SMSF annual returns if they remain active, or choose to wind up the fund. The ATO is warning SMSF trustees about their regulatory obligations and is paying close attention to those SMSFs that are not meeting their lodgment obligations. Trustees must lodge a Self-managed superannuation fund annual return 2017 if it was a self-managed super fund on 30 June 2017, or a self-managed super fund that was wound up during 2016-17. Super funds that are not SMSFs at the end of 2016-17 must use the fund income tax return 2017 and, where required, a separate super member contributions statement. Even if your fund does not have a tax liability, your SMSF must lodge an SMSF annual return.


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SMSFs: Stats

Posted on November 10, 2017 by admin


The Australian Tax Office (ATO) has released its June 2017 quarterly SMSF statistical report detailing key SMSF figures. As of June 2017, the number of SMSFs increased to 596,516. The number of SMSF members in Australia is 1,124,453. The estimated value of total Australian and overseas SMSF assets is $696.7 billion. The number of annual wind-ups including both those initiated by trustees and those as a result of ATO compliance and cleansing activity was 1,419 as of June 2017. This is a significant decrease from 10,551 in June 2016. The top five asset types held by SMSFs by value include listed shares (30 per cent or $212,210m), cash and term deposits (23 per cent or $159,686m), non-residential real property (11 per cent or $74,772m), unlisted trusts (10 per cent or $71,455m) and other managed investments (5 per cent or $37,695m).


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SMSF: Capital vs revenue expenses

Posted on November 1, 2017 by admin


Self-managed super funds (SMSFs) have access to a range of tax deductions for expenses incurred. Whether the expenses are capital in nature or are considered as revenue will affect eligibility for claiming such deductions. The Tax Office considers an expense that is incurred in establishing or making enduring changes to a super fund’s structure or function as capital and not deductible under the general deduction provision. For example, the costs of establishing an SMSF are capital in nature. An expense incurred in acquiring capital assets is also usually capital in nature. Trust deed amendment costs incurred in establishing a trust, executing a new deed for an existing fund and amending a deed to enlarge or significantly alter the scope of the trust’s activities are generally not deductible as they are capital in nature. If trust deed amendments are required to facilitate the ongoing operations of the super fund, they are generally deductible. For example, if a fund amends a trust deed to keep it up to date with changes in super legislation this would be deductible. Furthermore, expenses incurred in making changes to the internal organisation or day to day running of the fund are not considered to be capital […]


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Lower House passes first home super scheme

Posted on October 27, 2017 by admin


While many Australian’s sit firmly on either side of the first home super scheme debate, the Lower House has passed the scheme. The scheme was proposed in the Budget released in May 2017 and was only just passed by the Lower House. The Government has notioned that Australia’s retirement savings system will not come under threat by allowing first-homebuyers to use their superannuation funds to save for a house deposit. The measure was passed with the strong backing of the Coalition, even though it is heavily opposed by Labor and the Greens. The opposition claims the scheme will not make housing more affordable, which is a key issue in the property market today, with record low numbers of young people entering into the property market.


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Super co-contributions

Posted on October 18, 2017 by admin


Individuals may be eligible for a Government super co-contribution. A Government co-contribution means the Government adds to your super. You may be eligible for the super co-contribution, low-income super contribution (LISC) from the 2012-13 to 2016-17 financial years, or low-income super tax offset (LISTO) from 1 July 2017. Super co-contribution The Government will make a co-contribution of up to $500 if you are a low or middle-income earner and make personal (after-tax) contributions to your fund. The eligibility conditions for a co-contribution from the 2017-18 financial year include: a total superannuation balance less than the general transfer balance cap for that year the contribution you made to your super fund must not exceed your non-concessional contributions cap for that year. Low-income super contribution The low-income super contribution (LISC) is a Government super payment of up to $500 to help low-income earners save for retirement. If you earn $37,000 or less a year, you may be eligible to receive a LISC payment directly into your super fund. The LISC is 15 per cent of before-tax super contributions made you or your employer from the 2012-13 to 2016-17 financial years. If you have reached your ‘preservation age’ and are retired you can […]


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Splitting super

Posted on October 13, 2017 by admin


When partners in an SMSF separate, there are specific legal and tax implications that should be considered. It is possible to split super benefits, i.e., transfer assets, such as property, from one super fund into another and roll money over to another fund; however, trustees need to keep the following in mind: Separating couples need to work out how they will split their super. They can choose to enter into a formal written agreement, seek Consent Orders, or if the separating couple cannot reach an agreement, they can seek a court order. It is important to have necessary documentation in the event of an ATO audit including financial and non-financial records. Due to the tax outcomes of splitting super in an SMSF, it is essential to have documentation, such as the notice for splitting the super, to show a genuine separation. There is the potential for SMSFs with property as a major form of investment to create a liquidity problem; however, this can be addressed with future contributions. Individuals will also need to be aware of the market valuation rules for real estate in SMSFs. If one member establishes a new single-member fund it is advisable to incorporate a special […]


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Transfer balance account report now available

Posted on October 5, 2017 by admin


The new transfer balance account report (TBAR) is available on the ATO’s website. Self-managed super funds can use the TBAR report to report events that affect an individual member’s transfer balance account. The option to report is available from 1 October 2017, however, SMSFs are not required to report anything until 1 July 2018. Events that affect a member’s transfer balance account will need to be reported to minimise the tax consequences of exceeding the transfer balance cap. Funds with straightforward affairs are likely to have only a few events per member to report over the life of the fund. Common events that will require reporting include: the values of any retirement phase income streams to which an SMSF member is entitled, including reversionary income streams the value of any commutation of a retirement phase income stream by an SMSF member structured settlement payments an SMSF member receives and contributes to their fund certain limited recourse borrowing repayments that give rise to a transfer balance credit as a result of recently enacted legislation.


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Keeping your SMSF compliant while overseas

Posted on September 27, 2017 by admin


Travelling overseas for an extended period of time is an exciting adventure. What isn’t so exciting is the prospect of breaking compliance laws in relation to your SMSF while enjoying your trip. There are specific conditions that must be met to deem the self-managed super fund ATO compliant. They are as follows: Fund recognised as an Australian fund The SMSF will be recognised as an Australian super fund provided that the setup of and initial contributions are likely to have been made and accepted by the trustee(s) in Australia or at least one of its assets is located in Australia. Management and control of the fund carried out in Australia The central management and control of the fund must ordinarily be in Australia. This means the SMSF’s strategic decisions are regularly made, and high-level duties and activities are performed in Australia. Some examples include formulating the investment strategy, reviewing the performance of the fund’s investments and determining how assets are to be used for member benefits. Generally, fund’s will meet this condition even if its central management and control is temporarily outside Australia for up to two years. If central management and control of the fund is permanently outside Australia […]


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How does the super guarantee charge work?

Posted on September 20, 2017 by admin


Employers who do not pay the minimum amount of super guarantee for their employee(s) by the due date may have to pay the super guarantee charge (SGC). The charge is made up of super guarantee shortfall amounts including any choice liability calculated on your employee’s salary or wages, interest on those amounts (currently 10 per cent) and an administration fee ($20 per employee, per quarter). Employers must report and rectify the missing payment by lodging an SGC statement by the due date and paying the SGC to the ATO. Employers may be able to use a late payment to reduce the amount of SGC, however, they must still lodge an SGC statement and pay the balance of the SGC to the ATO. The ATO prioritises the collection of unpaid SGC debts. If an employee reports an employer for unpaid super, the ATO will investigate on their behalf. Employers must lodge their SGC statement and pay the charge by the due date. Quarter Period Due date 1 1 July – 30 September 28 November 2 1 October – 31 December 28 February 3 1 January – 31 March 28 May 4 1 April – 30 June 28 August If a due […]


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New measures to crack down on super non-compliance

Posted on September 14, 2017 by admin


The Australian Taxation Office (ATO) will receive additional funding for a Superannuation Guarantee Taskforce to crack down on non-compliance by employers. The Government has announced a package of reforms to close a legal loophole used by dishonest employers that short-change employees who make salary-sacrifice contributions to super. Funding for the Taskforce coincides with new data released by the ATO reporting a significant estimated Super Guarantee gap. This gap is the difference between the theoretical amount payable by employers to be fully compliant and actual contributions received by funds. The ATO estimates the net SG gap as 5.2 per cent or $2.85 billion of the total estimated $54.78 billion in SG payments that employers were required to pay in 2014-15. The gap exists because some employers are not meeting their super guarantee obligations either by not paying enough or not paying at all. Employers who deliberately are not paying their workers’ super entitlements are robbing their workers of their wages. The new package aims to take action on this so employers cannot hide from their legal obligation. Some of the measures included in the package involve: A requirement for superannuation funds to report contributions received more frequently (at least monthly) to […]


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SMSF annual return for pension phase trustees

November 15, 2017

Self-managed super fund (SMSF) trustees who are in pension phase must lodge their SMSF annual returns if they remain active, or choose to wind up the fund.

The ATO is warning SMSF trustees about their regulatory obligations and is paying close attention to those SMSFs that are not meeting their lodgment obligations.

Trustees must lodge a Self-managed superannuation fund annual return 2017 if it was a self-managed super fund on 30 June 2017, or a self-managed super fund that was wound up during 2016-17.

Super funds that are not SMSFs at the end of 2016-17 must use the fund income tax return 2017 and, where required, a separate super member contributions statement.

Even if your fund does not have a tax liability, your SMSF must lodge an SMSF annual return.