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Division 7a in detail

Business owners sometimes borrow money from their own company for a variety of personal and financial reasons. However, there can be an issue with tax law compliance if the proper steps are not carried out in treating the transaction correctly.

Division 7a is an integrity measure of tax legislation that comes into effect when there is a loan by a company to the business’ owners and associates, i.e. the shareholders of the company. Associates are broadly defined and can include family members and other related entities.

Specifically, this tax law covers any monetary benefits including:

-payments made to a shareholder (or associate) by a private company, including transfers or uses of property for less than market value

-loans made without specific loan agreements

-debt forgiveness

These transactions may come under the Division 7a provisions and as such are treated as assessable unfranked dividends to the shareholder or associate, and are taxed accordingly.

An assessable unfranked dividend means that there are no franking credits available to the recipient, so the franking tax offset will not apply and the recipient will have to pay tax on the dividends at the usual marginal rate.

However, there a few instances in which Division 7a will not apply:

-if the payment is made to a shareholder or associate who is also an employee of the company, than the dividend may be treated as a fringe benefit instead.

-to payments of genuine debts

-if the loan is entered into formally with a written agreement outlining minimum interest rates and maximum term criteria. However, minimum yearly re- payments of the loan are required in order to avoid the amount’s being treated as dividends arising in later years.

-payments or loans excluded by virtue of other tax provisions

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What to do with your Lost Super

March 19, 2021

After COVID 19’s impact on the world, an influx of employees who had lost their jobs fell into the job market. Many of these came from companies that couldn’t afford to continue their employment. As a result, many individuals had to seek alternative employment, or draw from their super. Some individuals took on multiple jobs to pay bills, and others drew from the super that they had accumulated in the government’s early release scheme specifically for coronavirus related income loss.

Super is held by superannuation funds, and accumulates as a result of how much super an employer pays to the employees’ funds. Many Australians may find that they actually possess multiple super accounts as a result of having “lost” their super accounts during changeovers. It can also happen as a result of changing names, moving addresses, living overseas or changing jobs.

Australians can use the ATO’s online tools to:

As superannuation funds often have fees associated with their upkeep, as well as insurances that may be tied into it (such as life, total and permanent disability and income protection), it’s important to consult with providers before accounts are consolidated.

https://www.ato.gov.au/Individuals/Super/Growing-your-super/Keeping-track-of-your-super/#Lostsuper