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Do you have to pay tax on super death benefits?

When someone dies, their superannuation usually gets transferred to their beneficiary as superannuation death benefits. Depending on who the beneficiary is, the benefits may be taxed in some circumstances.

If you are a beneficiary, the amount of tax you pay depends on factors such as:

Someone who is tax-dependant will:

Lump sum payments

Lump sum super benefits paid to tax-dependant beneficiaries are not taxed, whereas those who are not tax-dependent will need to pay more tax and will only be able to receive the benefit as a lump sum. Not all super death benefits paid to a non-tax dependant are subject to tax. There are tax-free components that are made up of contributions after-tax that the member made to their super.

The taxed element (where the member paid tax in their super) of the taxable component of the benefit is subject to a maximum tax rate of 15% plus the Medicare levy. The untaxed element (where the death benefit is being paid from an untaxed super fund or includes proceeds from a life insurance policy held by the fund) of the taxable component of the benefit is subject to a maximum tax rate of 15% plus the Medicare levy.

Income stream payments

If the death benefit is paid in the form of an income stream, the tax treatment of the payment is dependent on the age of the deceased and beneficiary at the time.

If the deceased or the beneficiary is aged 60 or over at the time of the benefactor’s death and the super is paid from a taxed super fund, then the payment will not be taxed. If the age of the deceased and the age of the beneficiary are both under 60, the taxable portion of income stream payments will be treated as assessable income but will be entitled to a tax offset equal to 15% of the amount.

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News

You can now opt-out of super guarantee as a high income earner

February 21, 2020

If you’ve unintentionally been going over your superannuation concessional contributions cap in past years, you may not have to worry about it from now on. As of 1 January 2020, eligible individuals with multiple jobs can apply to opt-out of receiving super guarantee (SG) from some of their employers.

You may be eligible to apply if you:

Employees who are eligible can apply for the super guarantee shortfall exemption certificate when they complete the Super guarantee opt-out for high income earners with multiple employers form (NAT 75067).

When you opt-out of SG contributions, you must still receive SGC from at least one employer. If other employers agree to use the SG exemption, then they may provide an alternative remuneration package instead, as to not be disadvantaged. However, the exemption certificate: