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Do you need to pay superannuation for contractors?

A contractor can turn into an employee for legal and financial obligations, so when working with contractors, employers need to test whether they count as an employee or contractor for superannuation purposes according to the rules stated in the Superannuation Guarantee (SG).

The ATO states that even if contractors quote an Australian Business Number (ABN), they are identified as employees for superannuation guarantee purposes if they are paid mainly for their labour. Employers must make superannuation contributions to these workers if they are being paid:

If any of the above criteria are not met, then employers may not have to pay superannuation. The minimum amount of super that needs to be paid is 9.5% of each worker’s ordinary time earnings (OTE), which is what employees earn for their ordinary hours of work such as commissions, allowances, bonuses, and shift loading.

Employers who attempt to avoid financial and legal obligations to workers by disguising an employment relationship as an independent contracting arrangement can be held liable for ‘sham contracting’ under the Fair Work Act 2009. This can incur fines up to $54 000.

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Pros and cons of home reversion

February 25, 2021

Super (AU): Pros and cons of home reversion

Home reversion is when you sell a share of the future value of your home whilst still living there. You receive a lump sum payment and continue to own the remaining share of your home equity.

Pros

Cons