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Identifying undervalued assets

Recent research has found that an alarming 31 per cent of SMSF trustees consider choosing investments as one of the hardest aspects of running an SMSF. Value investing is one such strategy that SMSF investors can utilise to boost their portfolios.

Value investing involves identifying undervalued assets that have the potential to increase in value over time. These assets are generally priced well below their intrinsic value due to missed expectations, market crashes, cyclical fluctuations and so forth.

To identify undervalued assets or asset classes you need thorough analysis and good judgment. Look for asset classes that are inexpensive and backed by news. It is much better to invest in industries where you understand the business dynamics, i.e., how they make their money, underlying conditions and so on.

Furthermore, looking for businesses in industries with a sustainable competitive advantage where external factors do not affect them too much is ideal.

When evaluating stocks look at companies with a low debt load, are paying steady dividends and have a quality rating that is average or better. Other metrics to consider include:

Price-to-earnings ratio: This is a stock’s current share price divided by its annual earnings. A lower ratio indicates it is cheaper. Stocks with a ratio of 9 or less are typically undervalued.

Price-to-earnings growth: A stock’s price-to-earnings ratio divided by its projected earnings growth rate over a certain time frame. Ideally, companies with no deficits and where earnings increase over that time period are better.

Price-to-book value: This is calculated by dividing the current price by the book value per share. Investing in stocks which are selling below their book value is key.

As with any other investment strategy, it is best to seek professional advice if you are unsure whether value investing is appropriate for you.

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What Are The Consequences Of Improperly Lodged Tax Returns?

May 4, 2021

With tax return season approaching quickly this year, you may have already started looking into lodging your income tax return. Ensuring that your details are correct and that any information about your earned income from the year is lodged is the responsibility of the taxpayer and their tax agent. However, if during this income tax return process the tax obligations of the taxpayer fail to be complied with, the Australian Taxation Office has severe penalties that they can enforce.

Australian taxation laws authorise the ATO with the ability to impose administrative penalties for failing to comply with the tax obligations that taxpayers inherently possess.

As an example, taxpayers may be liable to penalties for making false or misleading statements, failing to lodge tax returns or taking a tax position that is not reasonably arguable. False or misleading statements have different consequences if the statement given results in a shortfall amount or not. In both cases, the penalty will not be imposed if the taxpayer took reasonable care in making the statement (though they may still be subject to another penalty provision) or the statement of the taxpayer is in accordance with the ATO’s advice, published statements or general administrative practices in relation to a tax law.

The penalty base rate for statements that resulted in a shortfall amount is calculated as a percentage of the tax shortfall, or in the case of no shortfall amount, as a multiple of a penalty unit. This percentage is determined by the behaviour that led to the shortfall amount or as a multiple of a penalty unit, which are as follows:

If a statement fails to be lodged at the appropriate time, you may be liable for a penalty of 75% of the tax-related liability if:

To ensure that the statements, returns and lodgements are done correctly, and avoid the risk of potential penalties, contact us today. We’re here to help.