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Penalty for unpaid super

Employers who are not meeting their super obligations may lose the tax deduction they would normally receive for super contributions. They will also have to pay a superannuation guarantee charge to the ATO.

From 1 July 2013 employers must be paying 9.25 percent of each eligible employee’s ordinary time earnings each quarter in super. From 1 July 2014 this will increase to 9.5 per cent.

The next quarterly cut-off for super contributions is the 28 April, which applies to the period of 1 January to 31 March.

If employers have not met their super obligations they will need to lodge a Superannuation guarantee charge statement with the ATO and also pay a superannuation guarantee charge.

Also, their business may lose the tax deduction that they would normally receive for superannuation contributions. This is because like most late payments the super guarantee charge is not tax deductible.

Employers will have to pay the super guarantee charge if:

-they do not pay enough super contributions to their employee. This is known as a super guarantee shortfall.

-they do not pay super contributions by the quarterly cut-off date for payment. The next payment cut-off date

-they do not pay super to their employee’s chosen super fund; this is called a choice liability.

The super guarantee charge is made up of the super guarantee shortfall amounts, nominal interest at 10 per cent per annum, and an administration fee of $20 per employee, per quarter

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News

Updates to the unclaimed superannuation money protocol

January 15, 2020

The Superannuation (Unclaimed Money and Lost Members) Act 1999 (SUMLMA), more commonly known as the unclaimed superannuation money protocol, has been updated recently to provide a clearer structure going forward.

SUMLMA provides guidance on in relation to unclaimed money, lost member accounts, superannuation accounts of former temporary residents and their associated reporting and payment obligations. The update has now added content on inactive low balance accounts.

The act now clearly defines what is an inactive low-balance account, how statements and payments work, the registering of lost members and various rules for special cases.

It is important to note that the information in the protocol does not apply to super providers that are trustees of a state or territory public sector super scheme, in which:

The protocol provides administrative guidance only and should not be taken as a replacement for the law or technical reporting specifications.