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Reduced super concessions under Division 293 tax

A tax may apply to individuals with high incomes to reduce the amount of concession paid on their super contributions. This tax is known as Division 293 tax.

Division 293 tax was introduced to reduce the concession on superannuation contributions for individuals with income greater than $300,000 per annum.

Under Division 293 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997 tax will be payable on certain contributions made from 1 July 2012.

If an individual’s income for surcharge purposes, plus their low-tax contributions are greater than $300,000, they may be liable to pay an extra 15 per cent tax on their taxable contributions.

For individuals who are members of a defined benefit fund Division 293 tax may be calculated on notional contributions, which are not capped.

There are also modifications to the contribution calculation for constitutionally protected state higher level office holders or Commonwealth justice.

To calculate whether an individual has income and low-tax contributions greater than $300,000 the ATO will be looking at:

-taxable income

-total reportable fringe benefit amounts

-net financial investment loss

-net rental property loss

-amounts on which family trust distribution tax has been paid

-super lump sum taxed elements with a zero tax rate.

The ATO will begin issuing Division 293 tax notices of assessment for the 2012-13 financial year to affected individuals from early February 2014.

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What Are The Consequences Of Improperly Lodged Tax Returns?

May 4, 2021

With tax return season approaching quickly this year, you may have already started looking into lodging your income tax return. Ensuring that your details are correct and that any information about your earned income from the year is lodged is the responsibility of the taxpayer and their tax agent. However, if during this income tax return process the tax obligations of the taxpayer fail to be complied with, the Australian Taxation Office has severe penalties that they can enforce.

Australian taxation laws authorise the ATO with the ability to impose administrative penalties for failing to comply with the tax obligations that taxpayers inherently possess.

As an example, taxpayers may be liable to penalties for making false or misleading statements, failing to lodge tax returns or taking a tax position that is not reasonably arguable. False or misleading statements have different consequences if the statement given results in a shortfall amount or not. In both cases, the penalty will not be imposed if the taxpayer took reasonable care in making the statement (though they may still be subject to another penalty provision) or the statement of the taxpayer is in accordance with the ATO’s advice, published statements or general administrative practices in relation to a tax law.

The penalty base rate for statements that resulted in a shortfall amount is calculated as a percentage of the tax shortfall, or in the case of no shortfall amount, as a multiple of a penalty unit. This percentage is determined by the behaviour that led to the shortfall amount or as a multiple of a penalty unit, which are as follows:

If a statement fails to be lodged at the appropriate time, you may be liable for a penalty of 75% of the tax-related liability if:

To ensure that the statements, returns and lodgements are done correctly, and avoid the risk of potential penalties, contact us today. We’re here to help.