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Rental property and tax

The Tax Office is reminding individuals who either own or are looking to purchase a rental property that there are essential record-keeping and taxation obligations that they must meet.

Examples of records to keep (for the period the individual owns the property for and up to five years after it is sold), include:
– Rental income
– Contract of purchase and sale
– Expenses
– Loan and refinancing documents
– Periods when the property was used for private use (i.e., family use)
– Steps taken to rent out the property (i.e., advertising)

Individuals must also declare all income they receive from renting out their property.
Examples of income may include:
– Rent received (before fees or expenses)
– Reimbursement for deductible expenditure
– Any fees collected from cancelled bookings
– Insurance payouts
– Booking or letting fees

Individuals can claim many expenses related to the property as immediate tax deductions or deductions over a number of years.

Immediate expense deductions include:
– Repairs and maintenance on the property
– Loan interest
– Property management fees

Expenses to claim as deductions over a number of tax returns include:
– Depreciating assets
– Capital works or improvements
– Borrowing expenses

Expenses accrued in buying or selling the property, using the property for personal use or travelling to inspect the property will not qualify for tax deductions.

While individuals can not claim expenses relating to buying or selling the property, these will form part of the Capital gains tax (CGT) calculations.

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News

Updates to the unclaimed superannuation money protocol

January 15, 2020

The Superannuation (Unclaimed Money and Lost Members) Act 1999 (SUMLMA), more commonly known as the unclaimed superannuation money protocol, has been updated recently to provide a clearer structure going forward.

SUMLMA provides guidance on in relation to unclaimed money, lost member accounts, superannuation accounts of former temporary residents and their associated reporting and payment obligations. The update has now added content on inactive low balance accounts.

The act now clearly defines what is an inactive low-balance account, how statements and payments work, the registering of lost members and various rules for special cases.

It is important to note that the information in the protocol does not apply to super providers that are trustees of a state or territory public sector super scheme, in which:

The protocol provides administrative guidance only and should not be taken as a replacement for the law or technical reporting specifications.