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Returning to work after accessing your super

Retirement isn’t necessarily a permanent thing as even the best-laid plans can collapse when circumstances change. The Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) has found the most common reasons retirees return to employment are financial necessity and boredom. But what does this mean when you have already dipped into your superannuation funds? Depending on your circumstances, there are rules regarding how you can return to work after retirement.

For those who genuinely retired with no intention of ever returning to work but found that circumstances required them to, you can return provided that you work on a casual basis up to 10 hours per week. By meeting this requirement, you can still access your super whilst working, however, additional contributions made to your account after you met the definition of retirement will be preserved until you meet another condition of release.

In the event you access your super after an employment arrangement comes to an end once reaching age 60, you are able to work in a new position as soon as you like, provided the first arrangement ended. In this event, you will have access to the benefits that became available as a result of your first employment arrangement coming to an end.

When you turn 65, you don’t have to be retired or satisfy any special conditions to get full access to your super savings. This means you can continue working or return to work if you have previously retired, provided you complete the work test requirements before going back. If you return to work and earn more than $450 a month, your employer will be required to make superannuation contributions at the current rate of 9.5% until you reach age 75 where you can still work but receive no further super contributions, either voluntary or from your employer.

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When Does A CGT Concession Or Exemption Apply To Your Small Business?

August 2, 2021

Small businesses are facing a set of challenges once again that can make fulfilling tax obligations seem like a daunting task. However, as a small business, capital gains tax concessions on assets used to conduct your business may be of interest to you. These assets are known as “active assets” and can, for example, be a tangible asset (such as commercial property), or an intangible asset (such as goodwill).

The turnover threshold for such CGT concessions is $2 million, according to the ATO.  If your turnover is more than $2 million, then you need to satisfy an assets test.

There are stringent eligibility requirements and conditions that you must meet in order to access these concessions.

If you have owned an active business asset, you may only be required to pay tax on 25% of the capital gain when the asset is disposed of.

If you are 55 years of age or older, and are retiring or are permanently incapacitated (and have owned an active business asset for at least 15 years), you may not have to pay any CGT when disposing of an asset by sale, gift or transfer. You might also be able to contribute the amount that you make from this exemption to your super fund without affecting your non-concessional contributions limits (you can speak with us about this if you are unsure about this process).

If you are under 55, the taxable 25% of the disposal of an asset can be paid into a complying fund or a retirement savings account. There is then a full CGT exemption on the sale of an active business asset of up to $500,000 (the lifetime limit). Any amounts earned from this exemption to CGT may be able to be paid into your super fund without affecting the non-concessional contributions limit).

Disposing of an active asset, but are going to buy a replacement asset or improve on an existing one? You can defer your capital gain in this instance until a later year. The replacement asset can be acquired one year before or up to two years after the last CGT event in the income year that you choose the roll-over for.

If the asset is a share in a company or an interest in a trust, there will be additional conditions that you will be required to meet as well. If you are a small business, there are other CGT exemptions, rollovers and concessions specific to small businesses that you may be able to access, if you meet the eligibility criteria. These small business CGT concessions will reduce the taxable capital gain and in some cases result in no tax being paid at all on the gain.

Speak with us to find out what you may be entitled to when it comes to CGT and your business to ensure that you are doing the right thing with your tax obligations after selling an asset.