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Reviewing your trust deed before 30 June

With changes to Australia’s superannuation rules coming into play on 1 July 2017, self-managed super fund (SMSF) trustees would do well to review their fund’s trust deed.

Despite the fact that maintaining an up-to-date trust deed is a vital aspect of managing a SMSF, many trustees fail to do so, usually due to the time and cost restraints associated. However, a SMSF trust deed can only ensure compliance and protect the trustee’s interests if it is regularly updated and reflects current superannuation rules.

As part of the super reforms announced in last year’s Federal Budget, tighter superannuation rules will apply from 1 July 2017, including a $1.6 million super balance cap for after-tax contributions; a maximum of up to $25,000 for concessional contributions; and the removal of the current “bring-forward” rule allowing $540,000 of contributions in one year.

According to some industry analysts, these changes are likely to result in many out-of- date trust deeds. But often changes to superannuation legislation provide the perfect opportunity for trustees to review and upgrade their deed.

One of the major changes to super which will affect traditional SMSF trust deeds is the $1.6 million limit on retirement balances, which the Government also wants to make retrospective. This means those who already have more than $1.6 million saved in their superannuation will need to adjust their strategy and trust deed accordingly to meet the new limit.

Updating a SMSF deed will particularly benefit those SMSF members with money locked in the old term-allocated pension and with a pension balance greater than $1.6 million in a mix of term-allocated pension and account-based pension balances. This is because the term-allocated pension can be converted back (in full or in part) to the accumulation phase to remove any excess over the $1.6 million cap.

Another major change to consider is the deed’s death benefit control mechanisms. The new super rules will allow certain death benefits to be rolled over, so it may be worthwhile reviewing whether the SMSF trust deed has sufficient options in the death benefit payment provisions.

SMSF trustees will also have to consider whether their current trust deed will allow for the terms of the trustee’s pension to change without needing to stop and restart the pension. Many of the upcoming super changes will dramatically affect the strategic landscape of SMSFs in Australia, and some of these changes will challenge old deeds, so, as with any other financial decision, seek professional advice if you are considering updating your trust deed.

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Proactive consolidation with ILBAs

November 13, 2019

Inactive low-balance accounts (ILBAs) are a new category account that needs to be reported and paid to the ATO. This was introduced in the Treasury Law Amendment (Protect Your Superannuation Package) Bill 2019 that came into effect on 1 July 2019 after first being announced in the 2018-19 Federal Budget.

ILBAs are designed to protect accounts from fee erosion. Where possible, the ATO will proactively consolidate super on behalf of an individual.

A superannuation account is considered an ILBA if the following criteria are met:

Funds are required to identify ILBAs on 30 June and 31 December each year, then report and pay them to the ATO by the statement date.

Individuals that have an account that they do not want to be transferred to the ATO as an ILBA, can consolidate super accounts using ATO online services through myGov, contact their super fund for more information or authorise their super fund to provide a written declaration to the ATO.