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Succession planning and the transfer balance cap

The superannuation transfer balance caps have been problematic for SMSF members who don’t take careful consideration when succession planning.

Failure to understand the impact of these transfer balance cap changes can have on your finances may force you to transfer large amounts of money out of your super.

The transfer balance cap of $1.6 million that was introduced as of 1 July 2017 limits the amount of superannuation that can be transferred into an individual’s retirement phase. The cap incorporates all accounts the individual holds balances in.

SMSF members ought be weary of the scenario in which a SMSF is paying two pensions, one to each party of a couple where both parties are receiving money under the transfer balance cap. When one of the spouses die, the remaining spouse could be in breach of the transfer balance cap because now they are the sole beneficiary of more than $1.6 million.

Luckily, if you take time to plan carefully how to avoid the above limitations, you can have control over where (and to who) your super will go to when you pass.

Consider the following:

Accumulation vs pension phase
The new transfer balance cap rules state that, at any given time, individuals cannot have more than $1.6 million in their pension phase. The money in the pension phase is taxed at zero percent; the money in the accumulation phase is taxed at 15 per cent. If you are already in the pension phase, and are with a spouse also in the pension phase, it is fruitful to think ahead as to what will happen to the money when one of you passes. Perhaps looking into what investments you can make now would be wise, particularly given that investment properties held for a period of longer than 12 months are taxed at a rate of 10 per cent.

Nominations
One option is to execute a binding death benefit nomination, which allows an individual to nominate who they would like their death benefits to be paid to. When preparing the BDBN, an individual can elect where their money goes and the trustee of their estate is bound to carry out these wishes. The other option is to execute a non-binding death benefit nomination, which allows the trustee some flexibility as to where they place your money. This is a good option if your wishes for your money are not as tax effective as possible; the trustee has the option to vary where you wanted the money to be placed.

In addition, when succession planning, it is important to remember that superannuation is not an asset that forms part of an individual’s estate; there are limitations as to who is a beneficiary of another’s superannuation. An individual must be a dependent of the deceased or a legal personal representative. If an individual fits this criteria, there are only two ways that they can be paid the benefit; through an income stream or via a lump sum.

To ensure you are not leaving your spouse or children the stress of the repercussions of breaching the transfer balance cap when you pass, speak to one of our accountants to establish the best possible plan for your estate.

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Understanding various kinds of super fees

February 16, 2018

No matter the kind of superfund you opt for, you will be subject to super fees. Understanding how these fees work and the difference they can make to your next egg is vital.

When it comes to superfund fees, there are two factors you need to get your head around; the kinds of fees you are being charged and the rate of fees you pay. Opting for a superfund based on these two factors can see you retire with hundreds of thousands more money.

You should be aware of the various types of fees you are being charged. If you would like to find out the fees you are being charged, you should do two things. Firstly, Google your fund’s product disclosure statement and scroll through to the fees section. You should see a list of different types of fees, with an explanation of what they are, how they are applied, and how often they will be incurred. Secondly, you should log in to your superfund account and take note of all the fees being charged to you. Investigate how closely these correspond and correlate with the product disclosure statement.

If you feel there are discrepancies, do not hesitate to contact your superfund or financial advisor and ask for clarification. It is worthwhile doing your research and comparing the fees you are being charged against other super funds and what they charge. Being complacent and not paying attention to your super is extremely irresponsible; the dividends you will receive later in life for being diligent now outweighs the burden of taking time to be informed today.

Some of the common super fees across the board include:

Another major factor contributing to how much you accumulate in your super account throughout your working life is the rate of fees you pay. Plain and simple, some funds offer much lower fees than other, creating a difference of hundreds of thousands of dollars when it comes time to retire.

Generally, funds are categorised into three groups; low super fees, medium super fees and high super fees. Ultimately, you want to be in a fund that charges low super fees. In saying this, it’s not only about super fees, as some funds have medium-high super fees but also perform better based on investment strategy, meaning you will get more back from your investments.