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Team building exercises

While hiring a group of people that work well in a team isn’t always easy, when you do, it can result in a more effective, productive and overall more successful workforce.

To create a strong team of workers, some businesses turn to setting aside a day to undertake team building exercises to rally everyone together and break down communication barriers, overcome shyness, build confidence in one another and overall unite everyone together.

Before engaging in team building exercises, businesses first need to establish the goal they wish to achieve from engaging in such activities. Many employers plan activities with no goal in mind, which often results in employees reverting back to their standard behaviour after the day of fun and games.

Examples of team building goals include overcoming conflict, improving communication, encouraging collaboration or even simply getting to know one another better.

Businesses also need to consider the type of team building exercises they would like to conduct to determine whether they need to set aside an entire day, half a day or even just a few hours to build a strong team of workers.

Location is also very important – is there enough space in the office to engage in team building exercises or will you need a larger area, like an outdoor field. Consider also whether you will need equipment and if employees will need to bring a spare change of clothes. Some employees may not be able to participate if they are wearing suits or heels.

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News

Updates to the unclaimed superannuation money protocol

January 15, 2020

The Superannuation (Unclaimed Money and Lost Members) Act 1999 (SUMLMA), more commonly known as the unclaimed superannuation money protocol, has been updated recently to provide a clearer structure going forward.

SUMLMA provides guidance on in relation to unclaimed money, lost member accounts, superannuation accounts of former temporary residents and their associated reporting and payment obligations. The update has now added content on inactive low balance accounts.

The act now clearly defines what is an inactive low-balance account, how statements and payments work, the registering of lost members and various rules for special cases.

It is important to note that the information in the protocol does not apply to super providers that are trustees of a state or territory public sector super scheme, in which:

The protocol provides administrative guidance only and should not be taken as a replacement for the law or technical reporting specifications.