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What Happens To My Tax If I Have More Than One Job?

Are you in the process of getting a second job to supplement your income? Or have you already received one, and are now simply confused about what you are being taxed on?

Gaining employment in a second position or job means that you may have a higher amount of tax withheld from your pay. Though this might sound daunting, it is simply because you are already claiming the tax-free threshold from another paying job.

The tax-free threshold in Australia is $18,200. If you are claiming your tax-free threshold, you are not paying tax on the first $18,200 earned in each income year. The tax-free threshold is equivalent to earning:

Withholding tax at a higher rate means that you are less likely to have a tax debt at the end of the income year

You may be receiving pay from two or more payers at the same time if you:

In these instances, your new employer will give you a Tax file number declaration to complete. Centrelink is also a payer who will give you this form if you apply for their payments.

When you fill in this form, you can choose whether to claim the tax-free threshold from your employer. However, if you are:

If you are in the position of having two jobs, it is recommended to claim the tax-free threshold from the payer who usually pays the highest salary or wage. Your other payers then withhold tax from your income at a higher rate, which is known as the no tax-free threshold rate. This is likely to reduce incurring a tax debt at the end of the financial year.

Sometimes the total tax withheld from all sources may be more or less than the amount you need to meet your end of year tax liability. These tax withheld amounts are credited to you when you lodge your income tax return. If too much tax is withheld, it may result in a tax refund. However, if not enough tax was withheld, the difference may need to be paid to the Australian Taxation Office (ATO) so that you have paid enough tax for your income.

Confused, concerned or a little perplexed about what having a second job could mean for your tax obligations? Want to know more about what happens if the tax withheld isn’t enough? You can speak with a registered tax agent like us about your tax liability in the event of a second job.

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Business Activity Statements – How To Take The Sting Out Of The Quarterly Payment

January 24, 2022

Been hearing a lot about business activity statements, and feeling more than a little pressure?

Kicking off the new year for your business shouldn’t be shrouded in the darkness that can be a looming BAS. But how can you be certain that your business is prepared?

To start with, demystifying the BAS might alleviate some of that anxiety and pressure your business may have been facing. Essentially, a business activity statement (BAS) is a government form that all businesses must lodge to the Australian Tax Office (ATO). All businesses registered for GST need to lodge a business activity statement (BAS). This can be done with the assistance of a registered tax agent or BAS agent.

A BAS is a summary of all the business taxes you have paid or will pay to the government during a specific period of time. You may lodge your BAS monthly, quarterly or annually (depending on the size of your business you may not have the annual or quarterly option) or may do so through your tax/BAS agent.

When lodging your BAS, you need to include these payments within it:

A BAS is issued by the ATO either monthly or quarterly. A form needs to be lodged with the ATO and payment made to the ATO by the due dates as follows:

(as registered tax agents we are given an extension to most of these deadlines)

You may instead be eligible to submit an Instalment Activity Statement (IAS). In the IAS, the ATO tells you every quarter what your GST instalment amount is and where applicable your PAYG instalment amount is.  Essentially, the IAS is a form that is similar to the BAS, but simpler in that you do not have to be concerned about GST and some other nominated taxes.

Businesses that are not registered for GST and individuals who are required to pay PAYG instalments or PAYG withholding (such as self-funded retirees) use this form to pay PAYG.

IAS provides a little more flexibility in the arrangement as the instalments are advised by the ATO on what you need to pay to cover your liabilities.

You may be able to vary those amounts if you feel that the advised instalments are too much or not enough to cover your liabilities. You may also be able to pay the amount in one lump sum at the end of the year. Before changing the amount due, or the timing of the payment, it’s best to consult with us (or your registered BAS agent) for additional advice to suit your circumstances.

Preparing For Your BAS

Your IAS and BAS can be used to assist in monitoring your business finances. Though you only need to lodge these every quarter, waiting until the due date to get all of the information you require for the statements may cause you to miss out on critical observations (such as how much you may actually owe the ATO).

Daily tracking of your income and expenses can assist in calculating your GST and other liabilities on your BAS, and allows you to ensure that there won’t be any nasty surprises waiting for you.

Here are some tips on how you can prepare for your BAS or IAS this quarter